Tarong Power Station

Project Description

Tarong Power Station was constructed in the mid 1980’s at a cost of more than A$1.2 billion. It consists of four generating units with a capacity of 350MW each, fed by bituminous coal via conveyor belt from a nearby mine. Across the entire plant a total of 38 energy efficiency opportunities were identified. Combined, these initiatives achieved a 28% energy reduction in Tarong Power Station Auxiliaries electricity use, saving 15.2 GWh p.a.

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Client: Stanwell, Tarong Power Station
Location: Tarong, Queensland, Australia
Business Line: Power Generation
Timeframe: 2010
Project Savings: A$13m over 5 years
Breakeven: 1.5 years

Tarong Power Station was constructed in the late 1970s at a cost of more than A$1.2 billion. It consists of four generating units with a capacity of 350MW each, fed by bituminous coal via a conveyor belt from a nearby mine.

At the time of construction, it was one of the most technically advanced coal fired power stations in the southern hemisphere. It is still the only power station in Australia to use hyperbolic, natural draft, cross-flow cooling towers with an external hot pond.

Across the entire plant a total of 38 energy efficiency opportunities were identified. Fourteen of these were non-capital initiatives aimed at addressing systemic issues at Tarong. The remaining 24 being specific capital projects, including significant air compressors savings of 38% through improved technology and system configuration. Combined, these initiatives achieved a 28% energy reduction in Tarong Power Station Auxiliaries electricity use, saving 15.2 GWh p.a. electricity use, saving 15.2 GWh p.a.